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. this view of america's islamist enemy is unfortunate endemic in both u.s. political parties, much of the u.s. and western media, and perhaps most damaging, much of the academy, especially and most prestigious universities. it is in my judgment that this is almost entirely without substantiation. and it continues to be washington's working assumption, america will slowly but surely be defeated with a loss of prestige, plot, financial solvency, and domestic political cohesion. we will lose not because any of these threats are stronger than we are. that certainly is not the case. america's myopic indeed can america's myopic coming elite and its media acolytes have taken enemies who are each in military capability, at most the puny five-foot tall, even sandals, and made them into 10-foot tall and still growing behemoths. the three threats i'm going to speak about are those posed by iran, saudi arabia and al qaeda and its allies. taking these three threats, each of which is based in the persian gulf, let us first look at the smallest least threatening threat, that which comes from iran. since our
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
>> glenn: from new york, good night america. >>> president obama warns muammar khadafy that the u.s. is ready to join an allied effort to protect civilians. a judge in wisconsin blocks the new collective bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was act
for the past two days with the u.s. military. trying to get a grasp of a progress report on the ground here. the successes, the frustrations, the planning for the way ahead. the uncertainty that lies along the way in this village, we are 30-miles from the afghan-pakistan border. still, ten years after the start of the war and it's still a hot bed along the border of taliban activity. this place has seen dramatic security change. development has come. not the case across the board in afghanistan but there have been successes in a moment, we'll show you that. you will hear the interview with general david petraeus before he heads back to washington to give a progress report to congress. jennifer griffin is traveling with robert gates as he travels here in afghanistan as well. all of that in a moment. but first, check in with shannon bream in the washington bureau for the top headlines of the day. >> thank you, bret. >> shannon: president obama ended a two-year ban on guantanamo bay and it will come two days ahead of congressional hearing about the danger of american radicalized by the terrori
-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations full-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations of american citizens. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wonderi
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
pushing back against mounting pressure to impose a military no-fly zone over libya. why one u.s. official says it's, quote, an extraordinary complex situation. plus, gas prices soaring as the crisis in libya intensifies. is it time now for the united states to tap into its emergency oil reserve to soften the blow at the pump? and an estimated 18,000 refugees crowded into a tent city near the libyan border as a full-blown humanitarian crisis is unfolding. lots happening right here today in "the situation room." pendingo much money on printing. i'd like to put you in charge of cutting costs. calm down. i know that it is not your job. what i'm saying... excuse me? alright, fine. no, you don't have to do it. ok? [ male announcer ] notre dame knows it's better for xerox to control its printing costs. so they can focus on winning on and off the field. [ manager ] are you sure i can't talk -- ok, no, i get it. [ male announcer ] with xerox, you're ready for real business. and go everywhere. to help revitalize a neighborhood in massachusetts, restore a historic landmark in harlem, fund a local bu
near me. i am greg gutfeld and i will see you soon. the u.s. and its allies continue attacks on government forces. the lawmakers here wonder what is the end game? this is as uprising spread to other nations raising bigger questions about the region. group of g.o.p. presidential hopefuls head to iowa. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm jim angele in for bret baier. african countries are calling for transition to lead to the democratic connections in libya. libyan government delegation is meeting in ethiopia with five african heads of state who want a roadmap for political reform there. political leaders don't have representative at the meeting. coalition forces continue to pound those loyal to gaddafi. the national correspondent jennifer griffin explains why cit exit is likely not in cards. >> good evening. on day seven of the operation over libya, command of the operation still in question and not likely to be settled before sunday at the earliest. >> a transition process that will take through the weekend, more allied pilots begone taking the l
gadhafi. we spoke to people on the streets there. they're thankful to countries likes the u.s. and france. they believe this will eventually lead to a free libya. there's a period of insurgency. this is the scary part because of how illogical gadhafi is and because of what he called his thirst for blood. >> alex, thanks. let's go to the capital of tripoli again. allen little, of the bbc is there. he joins us live. you heard the mood in benghazi. what do you think the next move is in tripoli? how are they portraying it there? >> reporter: well, finding colonel gadhafi. it's not hard to find people around the city here echoing the sentiments. people saying they're willing to die along with the colonel if it comes to that. there's though doubting the sincerity. their devotion gets more intense. the more isolated he becomes from the world. how represent sif that voice? no other voice can make itself heard here in the prevailing atmosphere in which patriotism is fused can devotion for the person of gadhafi himself. what of the people that don't take part in the demonstrations? what do they fee
are considering other ways to help those suffering in libya. hillary clinton says the u.s. military might have a role to play, such as getting supplies to where they're needed. the u.s. secretary of state acknowledged direct intervention would face major opposition. the arab league says it's against any foreign interference. >>> now, some people taking part in the uprising against colonel gadhafi say they want western forces to give support, to prevent more attacks by government planes. some politicians in washington say the u.s. should do just that. but the defense secretary told congress it wouldn't be easy. >> if it's ordered, we can do it. but the really is, and people, there's a lot of, frankly, loose talk about some of these military options. and let's just call a spade a spade. a no-fly zone begins with an attack on libya. to destroy the air defenses. that's the way you'd do a no-fly zone. and then you can fly planes around the country and not worry about our guys being shot down. but that's the way it starts. >> i'm not endorsing it. >> no, i understand that. but it also requires more
. and so modelers, the u.s. government, can see every level of the atmosphere. and if a piece of radiation, a big piece of radiation, a meltdown occurs, they will be able to run the models and figure out where that ra radiation's going to go. >> if there's a meltdown, as we know from chernobyl, this can kae. we have been talking about the amount of radiation that is likely released. it is not likely to have had some major effect across ocean. >> slight breaking news we haven't had on air yet. fukushima daiichi is what we have been talking about. >> right. >> shawn, zoom in. there's another plant ten miles south of there and they have issued a ten kilometer radius evacuation to that plan. this has literally happened in the past few hours. >> what is that? a fire? >> we literally doesn't know. >> some emergency. >> enough of an emergency that the people that are living around this plant are being forced to move. there's already a 30 kilometer around daiichi. >> must be unsettling to not know. he made the point, there are people who don't think the government's lying to them, they just don't
of an amnesty, a dialogue, and an invitation to a u.s. fact-finding mission, even a chance for a free press. for his hard-core supporters, it was a family day out, and it did not matter what he said. the libyans to do not like things the way they are, who do not want civil war, might listen and wonder whether the risks of taking on the regime are worth it. the colonel's leadership style is eccentric, but he is hitting back hard and slowing the rebellion against his rule. that was something they could not do in egypt or tunisia. jeremy bowen, bbc news, tripoli. >> an international effort has begun to repatriate tens of thousands of foreigners, most of them egyptian, who have been massing on libya's border with tunisia. britain and france have sent several of their plans. the largest british warship is heading for libyan coastal waters. they have rescued 85,000 in the past week. we have this report from the border. >> the struggle for liberation in the arab world has led to this. men fighting for a seat on a bus, desperate to escape from libya, pleading to simply be allowed to go home. 85,000
he won't have that. >> in a statement to reporters he said u.s. forces won't land in libya and sources tell fox news, attack planes will not be used in the no-fly zone. operation requires american leadership but not that we act alone. >> this is precisely how the international community should work as more nations bear responsibility and the costs of enforcing international law. >> reporter: that should mean a smaller chair of costs that could range from a few million to a hundred million a week. there are reports his advisors were deeply divided over the prospect of military action but he has resisted gig up. he didn't want the u.s. to be the issue in another arab conflict. there were quiet rumbles from 18 men's of congress he briefed but statement to reporters later was aimed at winning over skeptical americans. >> here is why this matter -- left uncheck that khadafy would commit atrocities against his people, many thousands could die. humanitarian crisis would ensue. >> reporter: in language that recalled his predecessor, he also said the word of the international commun
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and today on capitol hill, u.s. energy secretary and nuclear expert steven chu said he, too, is baffled. >> and ther
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower radiation over a broad area. it must be said the japanese authorities are denying the report. but just one of several challenges that the authorities have been dealing with, in the last 24 hours. the problems with the stricken fukushima nuclear complex in northeastern japan change by the hour. on wednesday, a new fire ignited at one reactor and radioactive steam burst from another. it prompted remaining workers to be yanked and more residents to flee the area. >> if the fuel rods are exposed the radiation material inside the container could seep out. >> it's also causing the people of t
. correspondent amy kellogg tells us what happened. >> reporter: two u.s. airmen were shot dead on a bus, transporting security forces team at frank further airport in germany -- frankfurt airport in germany. on their way to support overseas contingency operation. >> i'm saddened and outraged by the attack that took lives of two americans and wounded two others. i think the american people are united in expressing our gratitude for the service for folks who were lost. >> reporter: the airmen killed were based at the royal air force base in england, the largest u.s. air force base in the united kingdom, where there are three squadron of f-15 fighters the motive is unknown. the u.s. authorities believe the shooter is now in german customer yelled alaw akbar at the attack. they say his family comes from a flashpoint town in cos sew vo. it was a u.s. -led nato mission that liberated cos sew vo from serbia aggression. >> it's a terrible incident and germany will do everything possible to find out what happened. >> reporter: republican congressman from pennsylvania chairman of homeland securit
to the airport there. he is going to join us for the very latest. again two u.s. service members among those who were killed and injured in an attack there at the airport in germany. we will bring that to you in just a short time. also we want to bring you up to date on fast moving developments. the libyan military has dropped three bombs and you see it on the map, brega. the opposition may control the town managing to drive out libyan troops. that's not the only place to see military action there. military camps on the outskirts. first we want to tell you about an aerial bombing has led some to propose the united states consider imposing a no-fly zone over the country. but the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said he called this a complex operation. one of those is a uss -- you are looking here at a photo of the ship from today as it went through the canal. near the region. secretary of defense, robert gates has said the repositioning is to provide humanitarian relief and the capen't for emergency evaguations. let me tell you about the capabilities. it has the ability to transport troops,
:00. >> japanese helicopter pilots dumped sea water on damaged nuclear reactors to try to prevent meltdowns as u.s. experts issue an a.m. now warning. >> good evening i'm julie haener. >> and i'm frank somerville. japanese helicopter pilots are trying to fight the meltdown. sea water is being dumped on to the spent fuel rods in order to reduce the radiation exposure. nuclear reactors need a constant source of cooling water. officials in japan hope the helicopter bucket brigade can keep the reactors from overheating while the plant operators scramble to install a power line and use electricity to restore the reactor's cooling systems. >>> now, less than an hour ago, word came that the united states will start evacuating americans from japan, including private citizens and the families of u.s. personnel. president obama informed japan's prime minister of the plans tonight. the obama administration is chartering aircraft to accommodate americans who want to leave. also today the chairman of the u.s. regulatory commission says radiation near the fukushima plant is extremely high and damage at one reac
launches air strikes in eastern libya as it battles to regain control. two u.s. soldiers are killed in a shooting at frankfurt airport. german interior minister thomas de maiziere takes the defense portfolio in a cabinet reshuffle. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we begin in libya, where gaddafi has threatened to start a war if the u.s. or nato intervenes in the unrest. speaking at a political rally, gaddafi says thousands of libyans could be killed if foreign powers and to the country. member is in the suez canal are heading toward libya as the u.s. and u.n. high pressure on the regime. forces loyal to gaddafi launched air strikes on a rebel- controlled town in the east of the country. >> dozens of seriously injured rebel soldiers have been admitted to this hospital. pro-gaddafi forces have launched air strikes on the city. the libyan leader attempts to recapture lost territory in the east of the country. inhabitants are fleeing the battles. there were intense clashes further west, in the oil port held by the rebels. gaddafi is striking back fro
week." u.s. and allied bombs and missiles hammer libyan targets. the rebels gain ground. and the president prepares to make his pitch to the american people. >> it's u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> what if gadhafi stays? just back from the middle east, robert gates and hillary clinton come to "this week" for their first interviews since the attacks began to make the president's case. what does victory look like? kit be achieved? at what cost? >>> then -- >> i don't have any regrets at all. >> what would donald rumsfeld do in a third war. and he'll respond to critics who say he's been rewriting history. >>> and george will and the "roundtable" will talk to us. why is one hopeful having a tough time agreeing with himself. >> announcer: live from the newseum. >>> some major developments in libya. rebel forces have scored a key victory taking back the oil town of brega in theest. they continue the push west. abc's alex marquardt is in benghazi. what is the mood there? >> reporter: a lot of gun fire and horn honking. a quick advance toward the west was expected follo
three mile island by his estimates. but as chu tells it, even the u.s. government doesn't really precisely know what's happening there. so keep that in mind as we show you some of these pictures that aired live today. what you're looking at there, it's either smoke, could be steam, it rose today from the plant after officials reported a second atomic reactor may have ruptu ruptured. later on, a japanese spokesman seemed to walk that statement back saying damage to the number 3 reactor appeared not to be that severe. so, going forward, we say who knows. but here's what we know. here's the thing. radiation levels then spiked above the plant which prompted the japanese to ground those helicopters trying to cool the plant. we talked about this yesterday, how those helicopters were going to drop some of the cooler water on the plants. but keep this in mind. they've now got concerns at all six reactors. you see them, 1 through 6, right in front of you, including the two off to the side, numbers 5 and 6. then you have 4, 5 and 6. they were all offline when the tsunami hit last friday, b
. look. it appears to be number four that drove the u.s. government to dramatically break with the japanese government today, to start giving its own american assessment of what is going on at this reactor and these reactors instead of repeating what the japanese were saying. it is number four, or at least it appears to be the number four reactor that led the u.s. government to say that u.s. citizens should evacuate from an area around the reactor that is larger than what the japanese government has suggested. here is what's going on at reactor four. reactor four reportedly contains 130 tons of spent fuel. there's a reactor there. that was off when the quake happened. but it is still there. there's the reactor there, that was off. that's presumably cool shut down. then the spent fuel pool. 130 tons of spent fuel in that pool. for reference, that's about 28% less fuel than what blew up at chernobyl. the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission reportedly has its own experts on site at daiichi. even though japan is not saying this, american nuclear authorities, our nuclear regulat
foreign policy program for the region, highly dependent on the u.s. and western support. iran is qualitatively different. they have been politically independent. and is to give you an example of how the regime despite all of its failings, up until 2009i would argue that it still had a certain degree of legitimacy. that is reflected in the fact that in 2009 we had a phenomenal event or about 80-85 percent of the electorate shows up to the ballot box to cast a vote hoping this people who voted for the opposition, the they could change the course of the public, not drastically, but change back to the performance days. the fact that people were voting in high numbers suggests that they believe the electoral system had a certain degree of legitimacy. it could shift the direction which speaks to a certain degree of legitimacy. no wonder is this now because the 2009 elections were largely stolen, but up until 2009 you did have a certain degree of legitimacy as reflected in the high voter turnout. never been in evidence anywhere in egypt or tunisia to the same extent that we have seen
is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is parting with some of her toys. >> this is tigger. >> tigger is going to be hard. >> reporter: the florenc
on to prevent a major nuclear disaster many foreign governments are advising nationals to leave tokyo. the u.s. is not allowing any of its military within 80 kilometers of the plant. the japanese government has only told people within 20 kilometers to leave. we have obtained footage from a local tv crew wants to tell the story of those trapped. >> a japanese team makes its way cautiously into the place. this is 12 miles from the stricken nuclear plant. people have been warned to stay indoors. visitors make a local hospital nervous. the door is locked. they check them thoroughly for radiation before they will let them in. inside a staff who has chosen to stay with their patients rather than flee. >> we are not supposed to stay here. this is our job. i resent the nuclear plant. >> at city hall they say no one will help them. they had been forgotten or abandoned by the powers that be. >> we were not told when the first reactor exploded. the government does that tell us anything. they are leading us to dye it. >> they say they have no means to get out. fuel is scarce and relief teams are reluctant
close enough to make an impact. they cannot get close enough. the first flight of u.s. citizens left japan. in the u.s. citizens that have chosen to stay are requested to leave the area within 50 mi. are around that. >> we have driven this out, 1, 2, 3, 4, all four reactors. we will show you where these possible toxic levels are going. the first thing to keep in mind is that to keep this to the bay area. this has to be very high up. this gold aero will give you an idea. this is representing 1 mi. tall minimum. of those particles would need to be before they could make it and even make it perhaps three times that to make a meaningful impact. as we look through the 20 mi. no plighfly zone. and it is even recommended of a 50 mi. zone recommended by americans. this wind pattern has bencarrying this to the jets stream and it went through the alaskan islands. as we remind you that on thursday, there is a big storm in the pacific which is greek force us. that moisture is causing real active to going through the pacific. by tomorrow, that radioactivity--when it makes landfall there should be
effectively control the whole eastern half of the country. increasingly the u.s. and nato seem more comfortable doing big with this man, the face of the revolution. a former justice minister now tasked with forming an alternative government. he says he needs one favor from the west, a no-fly zone. we want an air space embargo to keep gadhafi from bringing in mercenaries from africa, and we'll do the rest he said. ratcheting up pressure on gadhafi, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton meeting on pond with allies in geneva said a no mif fly zone in on the table. >> the people of libya have made themselves clear. it is time for gadhafi to go. now without further violence or delay. >> reporter: gadhafi's not listening. civil war seems imminent, and the exodus of thousands of refugees every day will like lil only grow. still, it doesn't have to be bloody. one libya contact very close to the regime says that its several of his inner circle sdited to bolt, then the game is over. so far that hasn't happened. i'm jim maceda from nbc news reporting from tripoli. >>> with all the turmoil ac
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
unlikely that the u.s. would move forward unilaterally. that's all the indications we have gotten from very senior officials here at the white house. instead, they have made clear that they would want to build some sort of a coalition, us a noted, before the u.n. or with nato. bottom line with nato forces that china and/or china or russia could block that, seems likely they would, in terms of any effort to move forward militarily and nato strained with resources in afghanistan. unclear whether or not nato would be on board. still a lot of work behind the scenes, but i think it's fair to say that it's highly unlikely that the u.s. would more forward without some sort of support from either the u.n. or nato, wolf. >> standing by to get more from the white house. hala gorani is standing by at the cnn center as well. we're awaiting moammar gadhafi. getting ready we're told to speak to journalists gathered at that journalist hotel in tripoli. we'll check in to see what's going on there as well. stand by for that. nic robertson is at the hotel and we'll, okay, have live coverage of gadhafi when h
of the border there are thousands of u.s. gun dealers. nearly all the weapons taken out of the hands of criminals there come from the u.s. just two months ago, secretary of state hillary clinton visited the country, and announced a half billion dollar aid package to help mexico fight organized crime. that said, this visit, well it does come just 16 days after an american immigration and customs agent was shot on a provincial mexican highway. all right. so mexican president calderon met this trip, met this trip with business leaders who are concerned about recent drug violence. mexico happens to be our third largest trade partner after canada, and then china. and it is the second largest market for american products. and again, i want to tell you you're looking live at the east room at the white house where we expect this joint news conference to begin at any moment and we're going to bring it to you. we're covering all angles on this, you know that. joining me live from washington is cnn's wolf blitzer. cnn's senior political analyst gloria borger, and from the north lawn the senior
almost $2 billion in appropriations and putting the u.s. taxpayer on the hook for another $40 billion in potential liabilities. mr. secretary, this committee never consented to these increases, authorization bills are needed for each bank spelling out specific forms and possibility withholding funds until forms are met. i can't support writing blank checks to the institutions. capital increases will be extremely difficult to justify without convincing evidence that the taxpayer dollars will be used in a more effective and transparent manner than they have been used in the past. mr. secretary, i predict the subcommittee will face difficult choices. we'll have to look at each request to determine what is critical to our national security. we must prioritize spending by looking at what works, what is good oversight, and what is not duplicated elsewhere. i urge you to approach the subcommittee with your request in that context today and as the year progresses. finally, i want to mention the unique role the treasury department plays in u.s. foreign policy. your work to administer sanctions
to drop water via helicopter were scrapped due to high levels of radiation. >>> also, members of the u.s. military have now been ordered to stay at least 50 miles away from the plant unless they have special authorization. the evacuation zone for japanese civilians is just over ten miles. >>> and the european union's energy chief said today the site is effectively out of control and suggested things may get catastrophically worse very soon. on capitol hill today, energy secretary steven chu said it's the worst nuclear disaster in a generation. >> i think the events unfolding in japan incidents actually appear to be more serious than three mile island. to what extent we don't really know now. and so as they're unfolding very rapidly on an hour-by-hour, day-by-day basis and there are conflicting reports, so we don't really know in detail what's happening. >>> amazing admission from the energy secretary. also president obama is reviewing u.s. assistance for japan and will meet with u.said at 1:30 this afternoon. >>> overseas andrea is traveling with secretary of state clinton and covered it
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